Monday, March 2, 2015

Whose Rule?

Write, Share, Give

Here is my struggle. There is a ‘rule’ about slicing that I am sure I impose on myself. I prefer to write first thing in the morning, when the house is still quiet and before the chaos of the day. If I wait until the chaos subsides I am likely to want to curl up with a book and the next thing I’ll know will be the light of dawn.

So, how do I write a slice for that day when the day hasn’t happened yet? See the dilemma? Like I said, the ‘rule’ is probably of my own making. I know many people slice about something from a day rather than necessarily that day.

Yes, my writing would happen before some of you have even had dinner the day before. Yes, I would then have to wait for it to be midnight in EST to link, but my writing would be completed.

Do I continue to keep my ‘rule’ or just get over it and focus on the writing being a peak into life?

Thoughts?

Spontaneous Conference

Write, Share, Give

For those of you who teach, you understand the hesitation when you see a parent in the hall. Will it simply be a ‘hello’ or will the parent want to turn the chance passing into a spontaneous mini conference? Many times you just don’t know for sure at first glance.

This afternoon, as I headed to pick up my class from recess my daughter’s teacher passed by. I waved in greeting. A few seconds later she was back. “Uh-oh!” I thought, as I knew she was headed for me, for a spontaneous conference.

Realizing I was headed somewhere she asked me to pass by sometime to look at my daughter’s recent on-demand writing. I asked if she could at least give me a hint (who knows when our schedules will coincide with matching preps!) The writing was a narrative piece. We have spoken (OK, I have listened) previously about my daughter not always choosing actual, real life events in her life for personal narratives.

It turns out that this story is interesting with fairies dying and Jesus and God doing something to welcome them and I’m not sure what else. The twist? She titled it, “My Dream”.

True? Who knows.
Sneaky? More likely.
Now, remember she is in kindergarten.
Ugh.

Sunday, March 1, 2015

So We Begin

I woke up this morning knowing it is the first of March, but finding it very hard to believe all the same. Today marks the second Sunday of Lent, a month until Easter (and Spring Break!), the week leading up to the Iditarod, March Book Madness, and just over a week until my birthday. All of those things are huge, but even more so is the commencement of the March Slice of Life Challenge, which is probably why most of you are reading this.

There are many of us on this journey together. A month of writing and reading, commenting and bonding the world over. Sometimes our words are brilliant and sometimes we will just be trying to get something down before the stroke of midnight. If you have been on this journey before, welcome back. If it is your first time WELCOME! Know that we all understand the commitment and challenges that come with joining the March SOLSC. We are in this together. For me, it is not just how I grow as I writer that keeps me a 'slicing', but the community of writers who are a part of it.

And so we begin!

Thursday, February 26, 2015

Thankful Thursday

 

They say this is a lucky sign. It happened to me today. Perhaps the ‘luck’ will be reaped later by seeds planted today.

IMG_2367

Tuesday, February 24, 2015

The Sound Of Cement

WRITE a slice of life story on your own blog. SHARE a link to your post in the comments section. GIVE comments to at least three other SOL bloggers.

Who knew that I would be excited about the sound of cement?!? You may wonder how this is possible. Our school is across a narrow street from another school. The other school is in the middle of a building project, which means most days I am listening to heavy machinery hammering away at the foundation hole or moving the chunks they dig out or moving dirt or other things I don’t have time to watch as I am trying to teach. All this happens with old, squeaky machinery. I have single pane windows with flimsy frames. There are times we can’t have discussion in our room because we can’t hear one another. 


In case you are feeling sorry for us, it isn’t all day as they don’t start until they youngest kids get out of school so that it doesn’t disturb their learning. The start up time coincides with the time that we have a couple of hours of solid content time in my room.

About half way through this afternoon I realized it was still quiet outside. I sauntered to the window to see if I could figure out the ‘why’. “A-ha!”, I thought. Pouring cement is wonderful (and quiet).

Monday, February 23, 2015

What Are You Reading?

“It’s Monday! What are you Reading?” is hosted by Sheila at Book Journey. It is a chance for book lovers to share their reading accomplishments as well as what is on the proverbial nightstand. She even does a giveaway. Subsequently Jen and Kellee atTeach Mentor Texts added an opportunity for those reading kidlit to join the fun. Since I read both I will post to both. Check them out, join the conversations, and discover more great books.

Books marked with an '*' I would put in my classroom library.
Books marked with a '#' would be in an middle or high school library.

* Image result for The Bully Book by Eric Kahn Gale The Bully Book by Eric Kahn Gale

# Image result for Noggin by John Corey Whaley Noggin by John Corey Whaley (audio)

* Image result for The Great Greene Heist by Varian Johnson The Great Greene Heist by Varian Johnson

* Image result for The Story of Owen: Dragonslayer of Trondheim by EK Johnston The Story of Owen: Dragonslayer of Trondheim by EK Johnston

# Image result for Glory O'Brien's History of the Future by AS King Glory O'Brien's History of the Future by AS King

# Image result for You Know Where To Find Me by Rachel Cohn You  Know Where To Find Me by Rachel Cohn

* Image result for Fatty Legs by Christy Jordan-Fenton & Margaret Pokiak Fenton Fatty Legs by Christy Jordan-Fenton & Margaret Pokiak Fenton

Image result for Spring-Heeled Back by Philip Pullman Spring-Heeled Jack by Philip Pullman